Sem Presser Lecture supported by DuPho

WORLD RENOWNED PHOTOGRAPHER STANLEY GREENE WILL PRESENT THE SEM PRESSER LECTURE SUPPORTED BY DUPHO, FRIDAY 21 APRIL 2017.

Stanley Greene

As a teenage member of the Black Panthers and anti-Vietnam War activist, Stanley was known in the early years of his career for his work The Western Front, a unique documentation of the 70s and 80s punk scene in San Francisco. An encounter with W. Eugene Smith turned his energies to photojournalism.

In 1986, Stanley moved to Paris, where he was a member of Agence VU in Paris from 1991 to 2007, and began covering events throughout the world. He was on hand to record the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the changing political winds in Eastern Europe and Russia brought Greene to a different kind of photojournalism. He soon found himself photographing the myriad aspects of the decline of communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union. In October 1993, he was trapped and almost killed in the White House in Moscow during a coup attempt against president Boris Yeltsin. After that Stanley’s work took him to Southern Sudan, India, Rwanda, Zaire, Nagorno-Karabakh, Iraq, Sudan, Darfur, Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Lebanon.

Stanley has worked for many of the world’s major news organisations, including Liberation, Paris Match, Time, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, and Le Nouvel Observateur. From 1994 to 2001, he photographed extensively the conflict in Chechnya, between rebels and the Russian armed forces. His photo book Open Wound: Chechnya 1994-2003, published by Trolley in 2003, made a lasting impression. His book Black Passport was published in 2010 by Schilt Publishing, Amsterdam. He has been recognized for his work with five World Press Photo awards, the W. Eugene Smith Award, the Alicia Patterson Award, and the Pipak 2011 (International Prize Albert Kahn Planet).

Who was Sem Presser?

Sem Presser (1917-1986) was one of the most famous and productive Dutch press photographers working after World War II. He was a press photographer documenting social issues in the 1930s: unemployment, protests against both communism and National Socialism, neutrality and the German threat, just to mention a few in these years of crisis. He was a war correspondent during the Second World War, and as a Jew he worked underground and at great risk. In the 1950s he also photographed celebrities like Sophia Loren, Pablo Picasso and Brigitte Bardot.

Why is there a lecture series named after him?

In 2003 World Press Photo recognized Sem Presser’s work by naming a lecture series after him. Presser played an important role as a board member of World Press Photo Foundation from 1971 until his death in 1986. Since 2003 World Press Photo has invited highly acclaimed, international speakers every year during the Awards Days (and now, Festival) to give the Sem Presser Lecture on a subject of crucial relevance to the field.

The Sem Presser Foundation is responsible for the conservation of the archive of Sem Presser, protects and maintains copyrights on the work of Sem Presser, and supports projects and activities in the field of documentary photography and photojournalism. This support has made the Sem Presser Lecture into one of the most prestigious keynote presentations in photojournalism.

In 2015 DuPho became a valued supporter of the lecture ensuring we can keep the legacy of Sem Presser connected to the World Press Photo Festival.

Previous Sem Presser Lecturers

2016: Abbas
2015: Anton Corbijn
2014: Edward Burtynsky
2013: Larry Towell
2012: Nick Nichols
2011: David Alan Harvey
2010: Eugene Richards
2009: Nan Goldin
2008: Martin Parr
2007: Susan Meiselas
2006: Oliviero Toscani
2005: David Campbell
2004: Fred Ritchin
2003: Vicky Goldberg

THURSDAY 20 APRIL
TO SATURDAY 22 APRIL 2017
AT THE COMPAGNIETHEATER

KLOVENIERSBURGWAL 50 | 1012 CX | AMSTERDAM